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Gingered Pomelo Sorbet

Pomelo Sorbet with Ginger

Do you do pomelo? The first time I had one, I had no idea about the pith situation, nor the thick skin on the segments and had a time with it. I’d heard they were delicious, saw one at a market, and picked it up for lunch thinking it’d be a nutritious option and I’d get to try something new to boot. Hah! Back in my office, I went to work peeling it with the steak knife I had in my drawer. And I kept working. And peeling, and working, and peeling. Until finally — no lie, about 10 minutes later — I got to the good stuff! I never made the mistake of tackling one outside of my own kitchen again, and have gotten more adept at it over time, but still don’t have them as often as I should.

Then a month or so ago, Darcie mentioned that she wanted to do a tutorial on prepping pomelo (which, by the way, is a terrific guide). I casually mentioned that maybe we should do a sorbet with the sections, and the next thing I knew, she’d come up with an amazing recipe. Let me tell you, it pays to be friends with a recipe developer!

Gingered Pomelo Sorbet

It was an overcast day, so we decided to use natural light to give the photos a soft feel. I really enjoyed taking a break from my strobes, which I’ve come to rely on even when going for a daylight look; it was nice to get back to my magic window and take a WYSIWYG approach to lighting. The props and backgrounds came together easily as well once we saw the prepared sorbet. The […]

April 20, 2017|Amy Roth Photo, citrus, Dairy-free, dessert, Desserts, Fruit, Ginger, Gluten-free, Pomelo, Sorbet|Comments Off on Gingered Pomelo Sorbet

Panettone Bread Pudding

Panettone Bread Pudding | Amy Roth Photo

Anyone who’s been around this blog for a while knows I’m a huge fan of bread pudding. It might’ve even been my first dessert-love, especially the way my grandma made it — just a touch sweet, with meringue on top, served with evaporated milk poured over the top. (Because you cannot separate a Cajun from their Pet Milk. Preach.)

But over the years, I’ve fooled around with the basic recipe a lot, and come up with different variations — everything from a blueberry-heavy pudding to a bananas foster bread pudding that I wouldn’t kick out of bed. But this version with Panettone is maybe the simplest one, and certainly has a great holiday spin. And if you must top it with something other than Pet Milk, it does not suck with the warm spiced rum sauce I found at Bon Appetit. Good gawd! Outrageous doesn’t even begin to cover it.

See what Darcie had to say about this over at Gourmet Creative, and enjoy!

Cherry Clafoutis

Gluten-Free Cherry Clafoutis | Minimally Invasive

I know a lot of people are impatient for farmers’ market darlings tomatoes and corn to make an appearance, but I’m just happy to experience the seasons as they unfold and enjoy each week’s new arrivals. Cherries came to market two weeks ago and I’ve been shoving them in my face with a speed rivaled only by Ru at his bowl. But I managed a little restraint as well, because what’s the start of cherry season without a clafoutis?

If you’ve never had clafoutis, you’re in for a treat. It’s a simple, homey French dessert with a custardy base and fruit baked in. Cherry is very popular, but you can use just about any fruit you’d like, really. The traditional recipe isn’t gluten-free so I haven’t made it in a while, but when I saw a recipe by Kimberley Hasselbrink at Cookbooks 365 that used a mixture of almond flour and brown rice flour, I knew clafoutis’ time had come again for me. Visit Cookbooks 365 for the recipe and stick around for a bit for delicious, wholesome recipes and gorgeous photography.

French Feta with Cherries | Minimally Invasive

Because I pitted more cherries than I needed for the clafoutis, I tried something a little different with the extras. To go with a luscious French feta I bought on a spur-of-the-moment trip to Corrado’s, I tossed halved sweet cherries with a touch of honey, some chopped rosemary, toasted and chopped pecans, a splash of […]

June 30, 2014|Cheese, Cherries, dessert, Farmers' Market, Fruit, Gluten-free|1 Comment

One of Us! One of Us!

Gluten-Free Pumpkin Doughnuts | Minimally Invasive

I’m generally immune to the pumpkin-washed hysteria that grips the popular imagination this time of year. I figure there’s plenty of time for that sort of thing before we see pretty, leafy produce again next spring. Plus, it’s just kinda gross. (I’m looking right at you, pumpkin-flavored coffee.) But our days have been unseasonably cool and I had a delicious roasted ambercup squash for breakfast yesterday, so I felt primed for a little pumpkin dessert. It’s ok, right? I mean, it is October and you do need to know about these before your fall baking gets underway…

I picked up a couple of doughnut pans for baking last year, but the recipes weren’t quite right, so I never shared them here. The larger pan functioned very well, honestly, despite the flavorless batter I filled it with. Actually, the mini doughnut pan worked well, too, but I just don’t have the patience to deal with something so precious for such a minimal output. YMMV. But this outing was a success thanks to this recipe for Gluten-Free Baked Pumpkin Doughnuts from Serious Eats (with just a few minor changes). I gave up on baking with gums a while ago and use ground psyllium husks now, instead. Just a pinch is what the Gluten-Free Girl recommends for this type of baking and it gave me an absolutely perfect result. I brushed the pan with melted coconut oil and […]

October 1, 2013|Autumn, Baking, dessert, Gluten-free|6 Comments

I &#9829 Donna Hay and her Crème Brûlée

Banana Crème Brûlée | Minimally Invasive

Donna Hay puts out one gorgeous food magazine. The photographs aren’t just consistently beautiful; they’re consistently “Donna Hay Magazine,” if you know what I mean. Once you pore over enough images from a single source, you’ll come to recognize a photographer’s or magazine’s style, assuming they have just one, and DHM has cornered the market on simple food styling, cool tones, and ingredients so fresh you can’t wait for them to be seasonal in the northern hemisphere. I picked up a copy on the newsstand a couple of months ago because I wanted the whole thing for my inspiration file, but this recipe was the one that jumped off the page for me.

Banana Crème Brûlée | Minimally Invasive

Banana crème brûlée. Discovering it was was a real come-to-Jesus moment.

Banana Crème Brûlée | Minimally Invasive

I can’t find the original photo or recipe online, but it’s a cinch to make. Just peel and slice a mini banana in half lengthwise and insert it into the dish of crème brûlée before putting it into the oven. Bake as usual, dust with sugar and torch it as usual, and enjoy (quite a bit more than usual, if you’re anything like me).

July 23, 2013|Baking, dessert, Gluten-free|2 Comments

Field to Feast: Strawberries & Rhubarb, Part III

Coconut-Rhubarb Popsicles | Minimally Invasive

After grilling up a feast, you’ll need a little something to cool you down. These coconut-rhubarb popsicles are just the thing.

Learn about growing strawberries and check out the delicious Strawberry-Rhubarb Sauce at The FarmGirl Cooks!

Field to Feast: Strawberries & Rhubarb, Part II

Strawberry Portrait at Minimally Invasive

As much as I love strawberries, I’ll admit that bringing home four pints at one time might have been overkill. Strawberries have such a short shelf life that you have to do something with them pretty quickly or you’ll find your very own science experiment growing in the refrigerator within days. Which is to say we were swimming in desserts last week. In addition to the galette I posted yesterday, I made a crisp (this time with rhubarb!) to use up a good portion of my bounty. We really tore through these desserts, not from fear of spoilage, but just because we couldn’t help ourselves.

And really, who doesn’t love a crisp? I’ve been trying to perfect a gluten-free version for the past few months, but the all-purpose flour blends weren’t working for me at all. Even after cutting back on the butter, they still oozed into a big sugary mass over the fruit instead of, well, crisping nicely on top. Since I’ve had such good luck with almond flour recently, I thought it might be worth a try here. To compensate for the extra fat from the almonds, I halved the butter from my regular crisp topping. And without patting myself too enthusiastically on the back (it’s just a crisp, after all), I want to tell you that this was really, really good. Gil rarely compliments my cooking, but he was over the moon with this one from the first bite, so I’d say it was a win-win —  a gluten-free dessert that’s marginally healthier than the original (if you don’t […]

Field to Feast: Strawberries & Rhubarb, Part I

Strawberries at Minimally Invasive

To be perfectly honest, rhubarb won’t make an appearance until the second post, but I hope you’ll forgive me, because today’s strawberry galette is a doozy on its own. And that was a surprise to me, because I usually find cooked strawberries a bit underwhelming on their own.

Galettes are one of my favorite desserts to make when spring rolls around because they’re incredibly easy and are supposed to look like crap RUSTIC, imperfection being a key selling point of this dessert! And honestly, I need no particular encouragement to make my baked goods look RUSTIC and HOMEY!

Gluten-Free Strawberry Galette at Minimally Invasive

See? RUSTIC! 

I’ve always been happy enough with the crust I use for galettes; it’s shot through with cornmeal, which gives it some heft and a really pleasing crunch that goes so, so well with whatever filling I’m using. This time around, I did swap out AP flour for Cup4Cup because I bake gluten-free now, but it worked perfectly.

My relationship with fruit fillings has always been a bit complicated. I like the individual berries to still have some form after baking — mushiness doesn’t do it for me — while tossing them with flour seems to muddle things on the visual and flavor fronts. I honestly didn’t think there was anything to be done about the flour because the juice that develops during baking has to go somewhere, but I was wrong to think there wasn’t another approach. Oh, so wrong. While looking around for some general amount of flour to use on the strawberries, I found […]

You Put the Lime in the Coconut

Lime-In-The-Coconut Macaroons

Could this holiday weekend be off to a better start? There’s no snow in the forecast and it’ll be warm enough to ditch my coat! SPRING IS HERE, and not a moment too soon!

To celebrate, here’s a little gluten-free treat that’s appropriate for both Passover and Easter, which overlap this year. I’ve posted about macaroons several times, but these Lime-in-the-Coconut Macaroons are a delicious spin on the original. The lime zest and reader-recommended tablespoon of juice are a perfect complement to the coconut shavings and put me in a tropical state of mind, which this glorious weather only encourages. Spring fever: Catch it!

And really, how gorgeous are these eggs from Nina’s Red Barn Farm? They’re practically ready for Easter without any dyeing at all.

March 29, 2013|Dairy-free, dessert, Gluten-free, Holiday, Macaroons, Vegetarian|2 Comments

A Crêpesplosion in My Kitchen

The Crêpes of Roth (and Bialas!)

When Gil and I visited Quebec City last July, I toured the city on foot during the day while he was working. My very first stop was the year-round farmers’ market down along the water. It was July, so produce was abundant and I ate my fill of flavorful wild blueberries and local cheeses, but once I tried Marche ou Crêpe, my breakfast for the week was decided. No tourist trap, this; it was out of the way enough that I never ran across huge crowds, plus I enjoyed a delicious crêpe each morning that sustained me through a day of climbing the hilly, winding streets.

Since then, I’ve tried my hand at making crêpes from time to time without much success — my sad little pancakes tear or fold over on themselves, inevitably imperfect thanks to my substandard technique — so when Kasha suggested a cooking/shooting play date around the theme of crêpes, I jumped at it. If you don’t know Kasha, she’s the brilliant mind behind The FarmGirl Cooks, one of the faces of Bialas Farms at the Ringwood Farmers’ Market and, as it turns out, a crêpe-maker extraordinaire. So we got together last Thursday and I think I’m still stuffed from the occasion. I contributed some Cajun and Creole fillings, while Kasha made ALL THE CRÊPES along with a savory and a sweet filling. Here’s how it went down.

Mushrooms — I sautéed shallots in butter until they were soft, then caramelized thinly sliced mushrooms in the pan, added a little thyme, salt & pepper, and a touch of cream to finish it off. Once we assembled the crêpe, it seemed a shame not to drizzle it with truffle oil, which was a good call.

Ham & Cheese — Kasha made a scrumptious bechamel loaded with jarlsberg, which went perfectly with a slice of ham. Folded into a little pocket and baked until everything was warm and gooey, this was easily my favorite of the bunch. (Gil’s, too, once he sampled everything Thursday evening.)

Cajun Shrimp — This was a play on shrimp & grits, minus the grits. I essentially used this Emeril recipe, though I didn’t really measure ingredients, and swapped out the red bell pepper for celery. I used much less broth than called for, too, just because such a loose filling would’ve made it impossible to eat. Over the weekend, I combined this leftover filling with the crab filling to make a stuffing for trout, which was excellent. Do try it sometime. (And I highly recommend Emeril’s recipe for Cajun seasoning included at the bottom of the shrimp & grits page. I make it without salt so I can season my dishes as much as I want — which is generally a lot — without turning them overly salty.)

Crab — My dad makes an awesome crab filling for stuffed peppers which I thought would be excellent here. Unfortunately, the lump crab meat I bought wasn’t nearly as good as the stuff he gets back home, but it was still quite tasty and very simple to make. Just sauté minced shallot in butter until soft, add a little flour to make a blond roux, then pour in heavy cream or half-and-half and cook until thickened slightly. Add crab and simmer until warmed through and the flavors mingle, then season with salt & pepper or Cajun seasoning to taste. I topped the crêpe with a sprinkling of paprika to fancy it up for the camera.

Grapefruit Curd — Kasha’s inspired creation. Instead of the more typical lemon curd, she played around with grapefruit, and accented it with tequila whipped cream and lime zest. Like I said, INSPIRED.

Bananas Foster — Because you can’t have savory Louisiana-inspired dishes and not finish with this. Again, I didn’t really follow a recipe, but melted brown sugar and plenty of butter in a skillet, then added bananas cut into quarters (halved lengthwise, then halved again crosswise). I flipped them a few times until they were softened, then added some spiced dark rum to the pan and let it cook down a bit. It would’ve been criminal to waste the leftover whipped cream from the grapefruit curd crêpes, so we repurposed it as a topping here instead of ice cream. You could always use the traditional banana liqueur in the recipe if you have it, then add rum and flambé the whole thing, but I have a distinct fear of flambé and a pantry lacking banana liqueur, so we went the easier route.

Naturally, I paid the price for eating so much gluten, but it was worth it to me. I’ll work on a good gluten-free crepe sometime (not just buckwheat) and will post it here once my technique catches up with my imagination. It could be a while, though. Just saying.

Be sure to check out Kasha’s take on the day at The FarmGirl Cooks. And bookmark her site. You’ll learn something new everyday, I promise.

a few outtakes after the jump

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March 26, 2013|Cajun/Creole, dessert, Seafood|3 Comments